Yestor, MyOption, YouOption Review: Failed Fake Binary Scam

I have been invited to join Yestor.net, MyOption.net, and YouOption.net multiple times recently. These sites are identical apart from the base color. But if you’ve been looking to make money online legitimately for a while, you’ll find red flags all over the place. If you want to understand why these sites may not be genuine, the following Yestor / MyOption / YouOption review will give you a few key warning signs. I hope it will help you spot them easily in the future when you come across a similar site.

2021 Update: It seems that all these three sites have become dormant for some time now. They still let you “trade” but now the sites are full of popup CPA ads, some of which are notorious for planting malware on your PC. This review content has now been updated accordingly.

Yestor / MyOption / YouOption Review

Product Name:

Yestor / MyOption / YouOption respectively

Website URL:

yestor.net / myoption.net / youoption.net

Type:

Binary options trading

Owner:

Unknown

Price:

Free to join

Rating:

What Are Yastor, MyOption and YouOption?

The domain registry reveals that MyOption.net and YouOption.net were both first registered in March 2018. Yastor.net in October 2018 respectively. The server of all three sites is hosted in Russia. Who owns these sites is not known, but we can assume that all 3 sites must be owned by the same person (or syndicate) from the exactly the same layout and content that they share each other.

They allow you to join free and give you a $25 “sign-up bonus” to trade binary options. 26 foreign exchange binary options are listed in the member’s dashboard (such as USD/EUR, GBP/USD, and so on). Choose one of them to start, and you’ll be automatically allocated to one of the 10 “traders” to trade it for you. As a basic user, you are allowed to bet $1 on each options trade.

Your profile will be upgraded when you've traded a certain number of times and invited a certain number of others;

  • Silver Membership when you've made 20 trades and invited 7 referrals. Your max bet will increase to $4.
  • Gold Membership when you've made 50 trades and invited 30 referrals. Your max bet will increase to $10.

The sites also encourage you to refer others, claiming to pay an initial compensation fee of $0.58 for each new referral, plus 40% of the profit each of the referrals makes. The initial fee will increase according to your account status; $1.17 if you are Silver, and $1.87 if you are Gold.

You don’t need any knowledge or experience, and all you do is literally keep clicking the “OK” buttons to request the (alleged) professional traders to make profits. Strangely, these sites always seem to make a small profit for you each day. And when your total profit reaches $115, it allows you to transfer it to your preferred account, such as bank wire transfer, PayPal, Bitcoin, etc. 

Of course all sounds too good to be true and none of this makes any sense. I’ll now explain why with some of the obvious red flags that I can spot on the sites.

Yestor, MyOption, YouOption Review

Red Flag #1: The Trading Is Supposed To Be Risky

In case you don’t know much about options trading, neither do I. But what I know is that options trading does carry a certain high degree of risk. Playing it without good knowledge and skills is a sheer gamble. You’ll either win or lose all your money. But MyOption, YouOption as well as Yastor.net all seem to offer some kind of guaranteed profit. They let you join for free and claims to give you profits “daily”. We all know there isn’t such “easy money for all.” 

Red Flag #2: The Sign-Up Bonus

A “sign up bonus” only makes sense when it’s offset against the payment you make, as a way of first-time user discount. No business gives you free money, lets you have the service for totally free, and lets you take the profit with you. No company would be so stupidly selfless, giving away money to random users worldwide.

These sites give you a sign-up bonus of $25 to play with options trading...but where does that money come from? That’s just not possible.

These sites initially encouraged you to deposit more money to upgrade your account to “Silver” or “Gold” but it seems that they no longer take any money from the users.

Red Flag #3: The “Professional Traders”

YouOption Finding Trader

Another dubious aspect is that binary betting is (claimed to be) handled by professional traders. All they explain is that the trading system analyzes each trader's daily statistics and selects the most successful professionals to work with your currency pair. So you just need to click the pre-chosen one from the list of 10+ traders. However,

  • The sites are located in Russia but all the traders’ names are English, e.g. Christopher Neal, John Parsons, etc. 
  • The traders’ profiles are never explained, so they can easily be made up. 
  • If the traders were real, there would be no reason why they should be sharing their profit with you.

Red Flag #4: Payment Methods

The minimum withdrawal threshold is set at $90 for all 3 sites, Yestor, MyOption, and YouOption. But they required you to have a balance of $25 for “further work with the system”. I assume it means that once your account balance reaches $115 (90+25) or over, you may withdraw $90. They claim that the withdrawals will be done manually on the 15th and 29th of each month.

What's most questionable is where you save your preferred payment method. This section claims to pay you in various different ways; Bank wire transfer, VISA, Mastercard, Bitcoin, Liqpay, Skrill, Payza, Amazon, PayPal, OKPAY, Webmoney WMZ, QIWI Wallet.

MyOption Payment Information

But whatever the method from the dropdown menu you may choose, there’s only one short box, and it doesn’t explain what kind of information is required from you. Just a bank account number or credit card number won’t get them to send money. Amazon would probably need an extra confirmation from you. This suggests that Yestor & co are not prepared to make any payments in the first place.

Red Flag #5: Fake Addresses

The "Contact Us" page shows the company's full address and phone number. Like I mentioned earlier, these sites are operated in Russia yet the contact address for each site indicates that they are located in Scotland. 

  • MyOption - 181 Rose Street, Edinburgh EH5 1BE, Scotland, UK.
  • YouOption - 181 Rose Street, Edinburgh EH5 1BE, Scotland, UK.
  • Yestor - 188 Rose Street, Edinburgh EH7 1DE, Scotland, UK.
Yestor Fake Addresses

But if you google these addresses, you can easily find out that they're fake. The postcode for "Rose Street" in Edinburgh is EH2. EH5 and EH7 are different parts of Edinburgh, so you know these postcodes are made up. If you also check the address "181/188 Rose Street" on Google Maps, you'll find totally different retailers at the location. 

I have also checked the phone numbers and, some of them seem to belong to a different company. So it appears that they display fake contact information to pretend as if the service is run by a legitimate company.

Red Flag #6: Fake Ads

Lastly, and probably most importantly, the kind of ads that pop up in your face say it all - zero trust. In fact, it’s a scam, stay away.

YouOption Malware Popup

On all three sites, fake advertisements are displayed across all pages. Fake “adblocker”, for example, pretends to offer an extension that blocks popup ads for you, but it actually plants adware on your browser. Yastor / MyOption / YouOption all seem to have scripts that randomly redirect you to several third-party malware download sites. 

Yastor / MyOption / YouOption Review - Conclusion

I don’t know what these sites were originally intended to do, but what they're doing now is clear. Their main (if not the only) income source is from the CPA ads that display, and they’re trying to get as many users to sign up to make money for themselves. The more users click on these deceptive ads, the more commissions the site owner will receive. Using such sites does not bring in any "profits" for you, and you run the risk of having your computer harmed by the malware that you may unknowingly download. Stay away.

(Real Time) Affiliate Income Report Last Month
December 2021: $8,518.30

About the author 

Ray Alexander

Hi! I’m Ray. Over the past 15+ years I have been involved with web designing, programming and online marketing. I work from home and have a passion for exploring new tools, services and programs in order to make money online. I’m here to help you succeed in building a profitable business by sharing my experiences. Any question, don’t hesitate to ask!

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  1. The Yestor site is accessible from anywhere on the web. It is up to you if you wish to join Yestor. You won’t be charged a fee for joining. If you are interested in joining Yestor you can. I will describe my experience as a member. At first, I found it difficult to understand what was going on. In order to expand my options, I found a post stating that MyOption allows you to become who you are. That is the case. They would only assist me if I spoke with YouOption. This is handled by them. There was nothing I needed to do. After I heard that MyOption would deliver my benefits, I became frightened to think about things. I called Yestor the next day, who told me to keep clicking. They brought opportunities to me. A sheet was blank. I received a message immediately and was told that they would rectify during these hours and they did. A receptionist invited me to where I took place. Three dollars were given to me by all those in attendance. A house never expected; three dollars were given to me by all those in attendance. I truly have no choice but to choose you.

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